Keystone Supports May National Mental Health Month

As the largest provider of integrated, collaborative healthcare in northeast Florida for children who have behavioral, developmental, mental, emotional and learning issues, Keystone Behavioral Pediatrics recognizes May as National Mental Health Month.

One of Keystone’s child psychologists, Max Horovitz, Ph.D., was interviewed by Action News CBS 47 Fox 30, about the connection between mental health issues and suicide by teenagers. Specifically, the news station was reporting on increasing concern by educators, schools and parents about the Netflix show, “13 Reasons Why,” which tells the story of the main character, Hannah Baker, who took her own life, leaving behind 13 tapes for the 13 people she said were responsible. Schools are beginning to send letters home to parents warning them about the show’s potentially dangerous message.

During the interview, Dr. Horovitz noted that some children are more easily influenced than others and parents might consider talking with their child about the show’s message. “We want kids to know there are a lot of ways they can be helped that don’t have to be suicide,” Horovitz said.

Several other occasions spotlight mental health issues throughout the month:

May 4 – Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day

May 7-13 – National Anxiety and Depression Awareness Week

May 13-17 – Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week

Keystone advocates every day for the importance of integrating behavioral health and primary care for children, youth and young adults is mental and/or substance use disorders by working with children in its Southside clinic, in their homes, at their schools and in the community. This year’s national theme, “Partnering for Help and Hope.” is especially meaningful, in light of the number of news stories recently that report instances of police having negative interactions with children and young adults who have special needs.

Keystone would welcome the opportunity to help local media discuss children’s mental health issues in a variety of subject areas to bring attention to National Mental Health Month. Its team of child psychologists and therapists can make themselves available for interviews as needed.

Keystone’s team also provides in-service training to educators in schools and other community organizations, police officers and emergency medical service providers. Keystone can share information and techniques to help them understand why children with special needs may act and/or react the ways that they do in stressful situations and what methods can be used to deescalate a potentially unpleasant or potentially dangerous situation.

To schedule an interview or an in-service training, contact Karen Rieley, director of marketing and communications, 904.333.1151, rieley@keystonebehavioral.com.

Keystone offers ABA services on Florida’s Emerald Coast

Keystone recently announced that ABA services are available to the Emerald Coast. The mission of Keystone Behavioral Pediatrics – Emerald Coast is to provide Okaloosa and neighboring counties with the same standard of excellence which has been established by KPB in the Jacksonville area. 

Presently, behavior therapists are offering ABA services in Emerald Coast homes, with the eventual goal of offering therapy in a variety of settings including a clinic, community settings and schools, in addition to in-home. Therapy is individualized to each child based on an initial assessment (ABLLS-R, VB-MAPP, AFLS, essentials for living, functional assessments of problem behaviors, etc.) and continually modified based on the child’s progress.

Laura Mathisen, M.S., BCBA, leads the team of ABA therapists for Keystone Behavioral Pediatrics – Emerald Coast.

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy is a systematic teaching approach based on B.F. Skinner’s analysis of behavior and the subsequent contributions of other behavior analysts. ABA focuses on changing behavior in socially significant ways to improve the lives of the children and families who seek ABA services.

Keystone’s Emerald Coast team is led by Laura Mathisen, M.S., BCBA, who serves as senior clinical supervisor. She has experience providing behavior analytic services for children and adults with developmental disabilities, genetic disorders and traumatic brain injuries. Mathisen specializes in early intervention services, problem behavior reduction and supervision of BCBA candidates. She worked at Keystone Behavioral Pediatrics for three years and eventually served as director of behavior analysis. After her military husband was transferred to Destin in 2013, she continued to work for Keystone as a senior clinical supervisor and board certified behavior analyst (BCBA), while also working as a BCBA clinical supervisor for a private ABA clinic in the Florida Panhandle, where her caseload primarily focused on problem behavior reduction and early intervention cases.

For questions and to make an appointment with the team at Keystone Behavioral Pediatrics – Emerald Coast, complete the Appointments or Contact form at www.keystonebehavioral.com or call 904.619.6071.

Keystone Behavioral Pediatrics, based in Jacksonville, Fla., offers consultation and integrated healthcare to children who may have one or more behavioral, developmental, socio-emotional or learning issues, for example, autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), intellectual delays, aggression, self-injury, tantrums, anxiety, compliance, self-help skills, toileting, speech/language or cognitive, physical, sensory, and motor skills. Keystone’s comprehensive and highly skilled team of providers – child psychologists, board certified behavior analysts, licensed mental health counselor, occupational therapists, speech/language pathologists, feeding therapists, registered behavioral technicians and clinical assistants – work together to develop a plan of action to provide success for each child through change. Medication management is also available, if medication is recommended as part of a child’s plan.

Macy’s Makes a Special Wish Come True at Thanksgiving for a Special Young Person

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Katie Falwell, CEO, hugs Sam LaManna, 14. She and other Keystone therapists have worked with Sam since he was six years old.

Sam LaManna is 14 years old and a student at Mainspring Academy a school for students with special needs. When he celebrated his birthday this past January, he had just one wish – to get an autograph from Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade Executive Producer, Amy Kule. Sam first saw Amy cut the ribbon at the parade a few years ago and she has been his hero ever since!

Sam’s mother had placenta previa, which caused birth trauma and low heart rate and oxygen levels for Sam. Five days after his birth, the doctors discovered that he had two intraventricular brain hemorrhages. Sam survived but now lives with hydrocephalus, the buildup of fluid in the cavities deep within the brain. The excess fluid increases the size of the cavities and puts pressure on the brain, which damages brain tissues and causes a large spectrum of impairments in brain function.

Macy’s has invited Sam and His Family to be Special Guests at the 90th Anniversary of its Thanksgiving Parade

Last year, with the help of his teacher, Sam made a video message asking Amy for her autograph. The video went viral, eventually Amy saw the video, and she was honored to make his wish come true. Not only did Amy send Sam an autograph, she made a video herself inviting his family, Sam and his former teacher to be her special guests at the 90th annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade! Amy and Al Roker, weather anchor on NBC’s Today and Sam’s other favorite person, have a special Thanksgiving Day planned for Sam.

Sam still attends Mainspring Academy, a private, nonprofit school located in Jacksonville’s Southside. The school opened in 2010 to serve children with a broad range of special needs from elementary through high school.

Sam also receives a number of therapies provided by Keystone Behavioral Pediatrics, which offers integrated healthcare for developmental, behavioral, emotional and learning issues. Using a collaborative team approach, more than 120 therapists are available to help children.

Sam’s lead therapist is Angela Chionchio. Keystone has worked with Sam since he was six years old. When his mother first brought Sam to Keystone in 2008, she described him as happy and affectionate, noting that he loved to read, learned quickly and had excellent memory. Yet, she was concerned that he was stubborn, easily distracted and developmentally delayed. He didn’t sit up until he was 13 months old and didn’t walk until he was 27 months old. Socially, Sam struggled to make friends and seemed disinterested and withdrawn around others.

According to Sam’s lead therapist, Angela Chionchio. “Sam has trouble with ‘first time listening,’ meaning he can be noncompliant when he impulsively sees an object that he wants play with but should not be available at the moment. In the classroom, his teacher and I prompt him to raise his hand to ask permission to do these things and offer him alternatives.”

Sam also has a problem with schedule change. “We help by preparing him for upcoming changes and praising him when he accepts change appropriately,” Angela says.

“Sam is doing great this year,” she says. His new classmates offer him opportunities to grow socially and behaviorally.

“When I asked Sam why he loved the parade so much, he said that it was because he loves when the producer cuts the ribbon at the start of the parade,” she laughs. “He said he also is very excited to see Santa Claus at the grand finale  and meet the host of the Today Show.”

“Sam is a wonderfully unique little guy,” his mom says. “I knew great things were inside him, but I needed Keystone’s help for Sam to bring out all that he has to offer the world.”

Sam’s trip to New York City is made even more special by the fact that his parents and he tried to visit the city last year, but had to cancel at the last minute because Sam needed emergency surgery. The IV shunt that was implanted in Sam’s brain unexpectedly quit working, so Sam had to endure hours of major surgery.

An implanted shunt diverts cerebrospinal fluid from the chambers within the brain to another body region where it will be absorbed. This creates an alternative route for removal of cerebrospinal fluid which is constantly produced within the brain and usually restores physiological balance.

Sam has blossomed under the therapy he receives at Keystone and in his classes at Mainspring Academy. All of us at Keystone and Mainspring are so excited for Sam that he has been able to achieve and even exceed his dream of getting autographs from Amy Kule and Al Roker.

“Sam is a wonderfully unique little guy,” his mom says. “I knew great things were inside him, but I needed Keystone’s help for Sam to bring out all that he has to offer the world.”

Sam’s trip to New York City is made even more special by the fact that his parents and he tried to visit the city last year, but had to cancel at the last minute because Sam needed emergency surgery. The IV shunt that was implanted in Sam’s brain unexpectedly quit working, so Sam had to endure hours of major surgery.

An implanted shunt diverts cerebrospinal fluid from the chambers within the brain to another body region where it will be absorbed. This creates an alternative route for removal of cerebrospinal fluid which is constantly produced within the brain and usually restores physiological balance.

Sam has blossomed under the therapy he receives at Keystone and in his classes at Mainspring Academy. All of us at Keystone and Mainspring are so excited for Sam that he has been able to achieve and even exceed his dream of getting autographs from Amy Kule and Al Roker.